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Several months later Licinius issued an edict which is commonly but erroneously known as the Edict of Milan. "Die Kämpfe um die Nachfolge nach dem Tode Constantins des Großen." Byzantinische Forschungen 6 (1979) 101-50. "Die Berufung des Constantius Chlorus und des Galerius zu Caesaren." Chiron 4 (1976) 567-76. Corpus Basilicarum Christianarum Romae: The Early Basilicas of Rome.

Constantine did not receive baptism until shortly before his death (see below).

It would be a mistake to interpret this as a lack of sincerity or commitment; in the fourth and fifth centuries Christians often delayed their baptisms until late in life.14 In February 313, probably, Constantine and Licinius met at Milan.

During the next night, so Eusebius' account continues, Christ appeared to Constantine and instructed him to place the heavenly sign on the battle standards of his army. "Laktanz: Erzieher von Konstantins Sohn Crispus zu Trier." Kurtrierisches Jahrbuch 25 (1985) 35-59.

The new battle standard became known as the labarum.

The next significant event in Constantine's religious development occurred in 312.

Lactantius, whom Constantine appointed tutor of his son Crispus6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28. Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years. His victory at the Milvian Bridge counts among the most decisive moments in world history, while his legalization and support of Christianity and his foundation of a 'New Rome' at Byzantium rank among the most momentous decisions ever made by a European ruler. The fact that ten Byzantine emperors after him bore his name may be seen as a measure of his importance and of the esteem in which he was held. Having previously attained the rank of tribune, provincial governor, and probably praetorian prefect, Constantius was raised, on 1 March 293, to the rank of Caesar in the First Tetrarchy organized by Diocletian.

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Lactantius, whom Constantine appointed tutor of his son Crispus11 and who therefore must have been close to the imperial family, reports that during the night before the Battle of the Milvian Bridge Constantine was commanded in a dream to place the sign of Christ on the shields of his soldiers.

The soldiers at once proclaimed him Augustus; 6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28.

Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years.

His victory at the Milvian Bridge counts among the most decisive moments in world history, while his legalization and support of Christianity and his foundation of a 'New Rome' at Byzantium rank among the most momentous decisions ever made by a European ruler.

The fact that ten Byzantine emperors after him bore his name may be seen as a measure of his importance and of the esteem in which he was held.

Having previously attained the rank of tribune, provincial governor, and probably praetorian prefect, Constantius was raised, on 1 March 293, to the rank of Caesar in the First Tetrarchy organized by Diocletian.

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Lactantius, whom Constantine appointed tutor of his son Crispus11 and who therefore must have been close to the imperial family, reports that during the night before the Battle of the Milvian Bridge Constantine was commanded in a dream to place the sign of Christ on the shields of his soldiers.

The soldiers at once proclaimed him Augustus; 6 Constantine henceforth observed this day as his dies imperii. "The Celestial Sign on Constantine's Shields at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge." Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association 2 (1981) 15-28.

Having settled affairs in Britain swiftly, he returned to the Continent, where the city of Augusta Treverorum (Trier) served as his principal residence for the next six years.

His victory at the Milvian Bridge counts among the most decisive moments in world history, while his legalization and support of Christianity and his foundation of a 'New Rome' at Byzantium rank among the most momentous decisions ever made by a European ruler.

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