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The same applies to the word ay in the Turkish equivalent, balayı.

In Hungarian language it is called "honey weeks" (mézeshetek).

Huloet writes: Hony mone, a term proverbially applied to such as be newly married, which will not fall out at the first, but th'one loveth the other at the beginning exceedingly, the likelihood of their exceadinge love appearing to aswage, ye which time the vulgar people call the hony mone.

Upper-class couples would take a "bridal tour", sometimes accompanied by friends or family, to visit relatives who had not been able to attend the wedding.

The practice soon spread to the European continent and was known as voyage à la façon anglaise (English-style voyage) in France from the 1820s onwards. a pure holiday voyage undertaken by the married couple) became widespread during the Belle Époque, as one of the first instances of modern mass tourism.

The earliest term for this in English was hony moone, which was recorded as early as 1546.

In Western culture, the custom of a newlywed couple going on a holiday together originated in early 19th century Great Britain.

One of the more recent citations in the Oxford English Dictionary indicates that, while today honeymoon has a positive meaning, the word was originally a reference to the inevitable waning of love like a phase of the moon.

This, the first known literary reference to the honeymoon, was penned in 1552, in Richard Huloet's Abecedarium Anglico Latinum.The Merriam-Webster dictionary reports the etymology as from "the idea that the first month of marriage is the sweetest." (1546) In ancient times honeymoon referred to the time of year when bee honey was ripe and cured to be harvested from hives or from the wild which made it the sweetest time of the year.This was usually around the Summer solstice by end June.A honeymoon can also be the first, "sweetest" moments a newly-wed couple spend together, or the first holiday they spend together to celebrate their marriage."The first month after marriage, when there is nothing but tenderness and pleasure" (Samuel Johnson); originally having no reference to the period of a month, but comparing the mutual affection of newly married persons to the changing moon which is no sooner full than it begins to wane; now, usually, the holiday spent together by a newly married couple, before settling down at home.(Yerach is used for month, rather than the more common Chodesh.

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